Lora Aroyo

Lora Aroyo

Google (USA)

Lora Aroyo is a Full Professor in Computer Science. Currently, she is a visiting scholar at the Columbia Data Science Institute at Columbia University, New York. She is also Chief of Science for a NY-based startup Tagasauris, which works on hybrid machine learning and human-assisted computing strategies to enrich multimedia (e.g. video, images, and text) with meaningful information about its content, and ultimately improve video search and discovery. Lora is an active member of the Human Computation, User Modeling and Semantic Web communities. She is an ACM distinguished speaker and the president of the User Modeling community (UM Inc). UM Inc serves as a steering committee for the ACM Conference Series “User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization” (UMAP) and is part of both SIGCHI and SIGWEB. In her role of UMAP steering committee chair, she also participates in the ACM SIGCHI conferences board. Since 2010 she has actively worked towards shaping the concept of “User-Centric Data Science“, which ultimately led to the forming and also heading of the User-centric Data Science group at the Department of Computer Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

As an expert in user-centric data science, Lora led a large number of research projects, organized conferences, workshops, and tutorials aimed at understanding ambiguity by applying techniques from crowdsourcing, data science and knowledge engineering to build ambiguity-aware hybrid human-AI systems for text and video understanding. Through her application of her work on semantic search, recommendation systems & personalised access to online multimedia collections in various application domains, she became a recognized leader in digital humanities, cultural heritage, and interactive TV.

She is an ACM distinguished speaker (https://speakers.acm.org/speakers/aroyo_8863) and a four times holder of IBM Faculty Award for her work on CrowdTruth (http://crowdtruth.org/): Crowdsourcing ground truth data for adapting IBM Watson system to the medical domain & applying Crowdtruth for capturing ambiguity to understand misinformation. Three notable current projects are: (1) CrowdTruth project “Harnessing Disagreement in Crowdsourcing for Ambiguity-aware Gold Standards”: http://crowdtruth.org/, (2) ReTV project “Re-inventing the TV for the Digital Age”: http://retv-project.eu/ and (3) CaptureBias project: “Diversity-aware Analysis of Bias in News Videos“ https://capturebias.wordpress.com/.

Chris Welty

Chris Welty

Google Research (USA)

Dr. Chris Welty is a Sr. Research Scientist at Google Research in New York, and an Endowed Professor of Cognitive Systems at the VU University, Amsterdam. His main area of interest is the interaction between structured knowledge (e.g. freebase), unstructured knowledge (e.g. natural language text), and human knowledge (e.g. crowdsourcing). His latest work focuses on understanding the continuous nature of truth in the presence of a diversity of perspectives, and he has been working with the google maps team to better understand user contributions that often disagree. Before Google, Dr. Welty was a member of the technical leadership team for IBM’s Watson – the question answering computer that destroyed the all-time best Jeopardy! champions in a widely televised contest. He appeared on the broadcast, discussing the technology behind Watson, as well as many articles in the popular and scientific press. His proudest moment was being interviewed for StarTrek.com about the project. He is a recipient of the AAAI Feigenbaum Prize for his work.

Frank van Harmelen

Frank van Harmelen

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Netherlands)

Frank van Harmelen is professor in Knowledge Representation and
Reasoning at the VU University Amsterdam. He has been involved in the
Semantic Web research programme since it’s inception in the late ’90s.
He is one of the co-designers of the W3C ontology representation
language OWL, and was involved in the design of Sesame, one of the most
widely used RDF repositories world wide. He is co-author of the Semantic
Web Primer, the first textbook on Semantic Web technologies, now
translated into 5 languages. He was scientific director of the Large
Knowledge Collider (LarKC), which aimed to build a platform for very
large scale distributed reasoning. Besides research into the fundamental
questions such as inconsistency, scalability, heterogeneity, and
dynamicity, he is also involved in a wide variety of applications of
semantic technologies, among others in medicine, the pharmaceutical
industry, scientific publishing and e-science. His work on the Sesame
triplestore received the 2012 “ISWC 10 year impact award”. He was
elected as member of the European Academy of Science in 2014 and of the
Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences in 2017.